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Negotiate Flex Hours to Save Money, Increase Productivity

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A coworker recently negotiated a change in his work schedule that will continue to meet our client’s needs, benefit our company, increase his value, increase his overall productivity, and save him a lot of money in the process. What did he do? He negotiated a change in his work schedule to give him time to take a professional training course.

Our normal hours are 8-5, with an hour lunch break, which equals an 8 hour day. He negotiated to work 10 hour days Mon-Thur at the client site, and to take the professional training course from home each Friday.

He comes into work an hour early to get a jump on other commuters, takes a half hour lunch, and stays an extra half hour after most people leave. The early morning is the most productive time of day for him, so our client will receive better service, plus the added benefit of his new training. Our company will have a happier and more efficient worker, and he ultimately increases his value on the open market if he ever decides to go to another company. He may even be able to turn this training into a promotion. It works out well for everyone involved.

Not only does he increase his value to our company, he will also save a lot of money with this arrangement. He has a 40 mile commute each way, so he currently spends $8-10 each day in gas. This working arrangement is likely temporary, but for the few months he works this schedule, he will save a couple hundred dollars on gas alone. He will also put fewer miles on his vehicle.

His commute is an hour each way which equals a lot of lost opportunity. One less day of commuting every week will free up 2 hours of time normally wasted. He will also save money by eating at home with his family on Fridays. More importantly, he will have more time at home with them.

Oh, and the best part? Our company is picking up his training tab. :)


Published or updated August 19, 2008.
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